The Daily Blog Open Mic – Monday – 9th December 2019

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Announce protest actions, general chit chat or give your opinion on issues we haven’t covered for the day.

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Todays press release about the climate emergency with quote; “horrendous” – weather events currently facing us all.

    “CEAC – Indian Ocean Dipole culprit causing horrendous weather events.”

    Monday 9th December 2019.

    Press Release: Citizens Environmental Advocacy Centre

    Subject; Climate change crisis; – Indian Ocean Dipole culprit causing horrendous weather events.”

    How do we stop IOD (Indian Ocean Dipole) destructive affects in NZ?

    Consider;

    The shock of an alarming release of the report at the Climate Change conference in Madrid COPs 25 last week on the discovery loss of widespread ocean oxygen linked to climate change was yet another watershed moment that we must now take seriously as dire for our future survival.

    Now we also learn that since 2014, Australia’s scientific agency “the CSIRO has been warning us of the ‘IOD’ (Indian Ocean Dipole) weather event that will change our global weather events for the next century.

    Question;
    Why hasn’t our NIWA been warning NZ citizens of this catastrophe that we I NZ are going to face?

    Since CSIRO in Australia alerted their citizens of this “IOD” back in 2014?https://takvera.blogspot.com/2014/06/indian-ocean-dipole-set-to-triple.html
    This is a very serious weather event phenomena identified in 2014.

    Here are the facts; Firstly according to the Japanese scientific agency here;
    Jing-Jia Luo, Ruochao Zhang, Swadhin K. Behera, and Yukio Masumoto*Frontier Research Center for Global Change, JAMSTEC, Yokohama, Japan
    See all authors & affiliations
    https://doi.org/10.1175/2009JCLI3104.1
    Published Online: 1 February 2010

    https://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/full/10.1175/2009JCLI3104.1

    Quote;
    “Climate variability in the tropical Indo-Pacific sector has undergone dramatic changes under global ocean warming. Extreme Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) events occurred repeatedly in recent decades with an unprecedented series of three consecutive episodes during 2006–08, causing vast climate and socioeconomic effects worldwide and weakening the historic El Niño–Indian monsoon relationship.”

    Australian CSIRO agency scientist’s report;
    https://takvera.blogspot.com/2014/06/indian-ocean-dipole-set-to-triple.html
    Quote;
    “Climate change and extreme weather is likely to hit the Indian Ocean rim countries much harder over the coming century. That is the conclusion of a new study lead by CSIRO climate scientist Wenju Cai.

    The research lead by Wenju Cai from CSIRO’s Marine and Atmosphere Division outlines that an increase in greenhouse gases and climate change is likely to cause more extreme positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events to occur and that this will likely triple the frequency of bushfires, floods and drought in Australia, Africa and India from one event every 17 years to one every 6 years.

    The interaction between ENSO and IOD still needs much more research and study to understand. IOD events are often triggered by El Nino, but can also sometimes occur during La Nina years as well.

    Dr Wenju Cai told the ABC:
    “Most of our severe bushfires were preconditioned by the Indian Ocean Dipole… When a summer season is preceded by an [extreme positive] Indian Ocean Dipole our bushfires tend to be much more severe.

    “Now this is in Australia, but it has global impact. [For example] in Indonesia, a positive Indian Ocean Dipole tends to cause drought. You may recall in 1997 we had a wild bushfire in Indonesia… emitting a lot of pollutants and smoke that caused health problems to many millions of people in the region and also cost lost economic activity because people couldn’t go out because of the visibility problem.

    “In the meantime, in eastern African countries, they experienced devastating floods, causing thousands to die… and displacement of many hundreds of thousands.”

    According to the Bureau of Meteorology in their 3 June 2014 report the Indian Ocean Dipole is currently in a neutral mode.
    The Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) is currently neutral. Model outlooks suggest the IOD is most likely to remain neutral through winter, with two of the five models surveyed suggesting a positive IOD may develop during spring. Positive IOD events often coincide with El Niño and are typically associated with large parts of southern and central Australia experiencing lower rainfall than usual.”
    Un-quote.

    CEAC recommends that our citizens see our own ‘responsible media’ finally alert our wider communities citizens to the IOD (Indian Ocean Dipole) phenomenon identified by “The research lead by Wenju Cai from CSIRO’s Marine and Atmosphere Division outlines that an increase in greenhouse gases and climate change is likely to cause more extreme positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events” so Government will be then be moving with urgency dealing with climate change to mitigate against the increasing “horrendous weather events” they are now reporting going forward.
    We have always advocated to Government for our transport to return using rail as our prime mover ‘of people and freight’ around our country.

    With rail we have no transport tyre ‘micro-plastic’ emissions, as micro-plastics are seen as the worst enemy causing climate change in the articles above.

    So less ‘transport micro-plastic dust’ is considered as a major plus – and only ‘steel wheels on a steel track’ will do the job to deal with Climate change, so if we lower the micro-plastics emissions in our environment we will make our lives healthy again then.

    End.

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