The Daily Blog Watch Wednesday 3 April

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Today’s Daily Blog Watch Round-Up of matters that have attracted the attention, assessments, and articulations of this country’s leading bloggers…

NZ Left Blogosphere

TDB Recommends NewzEngine.com

As revelations come thick and fast about Dear Leader’s dodgy relationship with spymaster Ian Fletcher and the equally dodgy means by which Fletcher was appointed as Director of the GCSB, the blogosphere went into Warp Drive…

On Tumeke,  Tim Selwyn goes Shhhhhhh – and details an exchange in the House, between Labour MP Grant Roberston and Gerry Brownlee. There is also reference to “selective amnesia” – gee, I wonder who that might be about?!

And The Jackal reminds us all, in Dishonest John , that what Dear Leader said last week may not necessarily hold true this week. In fact, probably never true at all.

Molly Melhuish gives a brief rundown on the Domestic Electricity Users Network Blog and rubbishes  John Key’s assurances that prices will drop after partial privatisation. Read  Why power prices are rising – it’s short and to the point. (Most folk will recognise Molly’s name as the country’s foremost expert on the energy sector and privatisation.)

Also on the issue of the energy sector, privatisation, and shenanigans surrounding Rio Tinto,   Gordon Campbell on the smelter fiasco, and its impact on the asset sales programme. Gordon invokes the   “investment savvy of Warren Buffett and the predictive power of Nostradamus” in a perceptive analysis of what the feck is going on between Meridian, Rio Tinto, and the government.

Tim Watkin on The Pundit writes about Rio Tinto, National, and Meridian in The Beehive political smelter. Tim questions Key’s “pragmatism” on this issue and points to Sky City and Warner Bros where the Nats were only to happy to bend over and ‘take on for the team’  to oblige  corporates. Perhaps Key knows something we don’t?

On The Dim Post, Danyl has his interpretations about the Rio Tinto/Meridian/Guvmint threeway and makes several  interesting points on the issue.  The best bit is about National’s  CEO John Key’s habit of blundering into things.

Can anyone remind us all how Key made his 50 million smackeroos without tripping over the tea lady and banging his head on the Zip water heater?

The Standard is on form today,

  • Karol write about Key and Fletcher in The CV of a Spy Boss, and detail’s Ian Fletcher’s background. Karol has done her homework, and her digs up much on  Fletcher. This is what the msm should be doing, instead of reporting inane fluffy pet stories, crime stories, and f**k knows what else.
  • In Caveat emptor,  James Henderson suggests that the impact of Rio Tinto closing down it’s Tiwai Point smelter – and thereby freeing up 15% more electricity – is being underplayed by market analysts. And it’s blindingly obvious why. *cough*share*cough*prices*cough*
  • Eddie writes about Cronyism is a piece entitled, simply, Cronyism.  Gee, now I wonder who and what Eddie might be referring  to?
  • Writing about Falling crime,  Anthony R0bins look at crime stats released today and questions if the picture is as simple as made out. Answer: nah. Not with Dear Leader around…
  • And in Drones over NZ,  Anthony R0bins writes about the disturbingly revelations that US drones have been flying over and through NZ airspace. One person’s solution to aerial snooping looks a bit ‘Star Trekky‘ – but hey, if it works, it sure beats a tin-foil hat…

And in Imperator Fish, Scott Yorke announces National’s Final Solution to environmental concerns  interfering with legitimate, hard-done-by, nice people up at  Big Business.  The solution may not be ‘elegant’ – but this’ll stop those pesky Greenies… See; Arrest of The Environment ends campaign of terror against businesses. And that’ll teach those f*****g snails to be on a Plateau where they’ve no business being!!

Tallulahspankhead writes in The Lady Garden, in a piece entitled Pay As You Weigh(t, what??), about  Samoa Air  charging passengers according to their weight, instead of a flat-rate seat charge. Tallulahspankhead is not a happy punter at this new policy.

And in Make Wealth History, Jeremy reviews economist J K Galbraith and the destructive nature of “bubbles” – both in 1929, and current day. Have we learnt anything from history?

F**k no.

That would make us clever buggers. Which we ain’t.

On The Daily Blog

– Is allowing the defense force to arrest protesters a goose step too far? – Martyn Bradbury writes about the growth of quasi-fascism in this country, and specifically Simon Bridges announcement last Sunday that sea-going protesters will be arrested, charged, and dealt with under new draconian laws. Key’s “Bright Future” will be bright alright; under the glare of 10,000 watt spotlights mounted on Guard Towers…

– So with the lowest crime in quarter of a century, why do Police need all that power and prisons?  – asks Martyn, and looks at crime stats; reported crime on TV; prisons; and who benefits.

Friends In High Places – Chris Trotter writes about the appointment of Ian Fletcher and asks a very simple question,

“The question is not whether the Prime Minister appointed his friend, Ian Fletcher, GCSB Director – but why?”

(My question happens to be WHY do New Zealanders still think that the sun and daffodils come out of the pr*ck’s backside. But that’s just me.)

– How Many New Zealanders Actually Marry Within The ‘Sight’ Of God.  – by Steve Gray, who poses the question,

“No gay hating celebrants will be forced to marry gay people. And why on earth do they figure gay people would want to be married by a gay hater?

(I still want my question answered as to what drugs/alien rays have been used to  mind control New Zealanders…)

Steve writes about the weirdness of gay-haters and much of it reminds me of the 1986 Homosexual Law Reform campaign. That one attracted busloads of bigots as well. (They must be cloned from a secret factory in North Korea. They’re probably the rejects of cloning attempts for Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un. )

Post of the week

Has to be Ideologically Impure, in her blogpost, Change the names BACK. If only to give the one-fingered salute to the inevitable howls of outrage from racists, red necks, and rightwing nutjobs who will be rearing up on their hind legs at the idea of using Maori names for the *north* and *south* islands any minute … soon… *checks watch*… now.