Latest

Three years after Charlie tragedy, ‘blaspheming’ journalists still face death

By   /  January 6, 2018  /  Bloggers, Dr David Robie, Most Recent Blogs, Setting The Agenda  /  8 Comments

Three years after 12 people were killed at the Paris headquarters of the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo on 7 January 2015, those who censor in the name of God still pose one of the gravest threats to the freedom to inform almost everywhere in the world. From one continent to the next, calls for the deaths of journalists accused of blasphemy circulate widely on social networks.

Read More →
Latest

Is Islam intrinsically evil? Reflections on Rupert Murdoch’s text

By   /  January 20, 2015  /  Deconstructing Headlines, Martyn Bradbury, Most Recent Blogs  /  30 Comments

To be honest. I don’t have much time for Religion.

Read More →
Latest

Charlie Hebdo for Kiwis: An open letter on fundamentalism

By   /  January 15, 2015  /  Bloggers, Deconstructing Headlines, Dr David Robie, Most Recent Blogs  /  18 Comments

Much of the New Zealand media coverage of the Charlie Hebdo tragedy and the consequent political fallout globally in Paris last week has been rather shallow. But here are some progressive insights.

Read More →
Latest

First Charlie Hebdo cover shows grace and courage

By   /  January 14, 2015  /  Martyn Bradbury, Media Watch, Most Recent Blogs  /  10 Comments

No one would have blamed the writers and cartoonists if they had produced an angry or crass image in the tone of some of their previous work, they resisted that and have shown the real power of satire.

Read More →
Latest

Am I really Charlie? On freedom of speech, double standards and true satire (warning – graphic images)

By   /  January 9, 2015  /  Deconstructing Headlines, Martyn Bradbury, Most Recent Blogs  /  119 Comments

There is NO justification for the murderous acts of violence perpetrated against the Charlie Hebdo cartoonists. Their deaths are a crime against free speech and the values for which democratic societies are built upon, but that doesn’t mean that there aren’t wider issues involved in these killings and wider perspectives that need consideration.

Read More →