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MUST READ: Nikki Kaye – playing politics with children’s health

By   /  February 11, 2019  /  Frank Macskasy, Most Recent Blogs, Setting The Agenda  /  15 Comments

The increase in child obesity occurred under National’s watch and was not helped by then-Minister of Education, Anne Tolley and then-Minister of Health, Tony Ryall, who scrapped the previous Labour government’s Healthy Food in Schools policy;

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MUST READ: National’s Food In Schools programme reveals depth of child poverty in New Zealand

By   /  February 29, 2016  /  Frank Macskasy, Most Recent Blogs, Setting The Agenda  /  24 Comments

The rise in demand for KickStart breakfasts occurred at the same time as those on welfare benefits was cut dramatically;

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Hekia Parata breaks law – ignores Official Information Act

By   /  December 1, 2015  /  Frank Macskasy, Most Recent Blogs, Setting The Agenda  /  21 Comments

A formal complaint has been laid with the Ombudsman’s Office after Education Minister, Hekia Parata, failed to comply with the Official Information Act.

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Hungry minds v. hungry bellies

By   /  July 4, 2015  /  Dianne Khan, Most Recent Blogs, Setting The Agenda  /  30 Comments

When I relieve in schools, I pack a hearty lunch – two or three rounds of sandwiches, 4-8 biscuits, a pile of crackers, and fruit coming out of the wazoo. I pack double or treble what I need because I know there will almost always be at least one student that needs to be fed in my class.

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Mr Key’s Mythical Principals

By   /  November 8, 2014  /  Dianne Khan, Most Recent Blogs, Setting The Agenda  /  11 Comments

John Key cockily asserts that he’s canvassed principals and only one or two kids per school, at most, are coming to school hungry. Of course, Key doesn’t name these principals or their schools. As Peter O’Connor commented, “I guess it gives new meaning to evidence based decision making when a chat with a few principals can be construed as evidence”

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