Wellington Electricity Network should be in NZ ownership – Social Credit

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Social Credit is calling for the Wellington electricity network to be returned to New Zealand ownership.

It is sheer madness for the electricity supply of critical infrastructure such as the New Zealand Parliament, Wellington Airport, all major government institutions including the Police and Security Intelligence Service, and network security-sensitive customers such as Datacom and the Department of Corrections to be in the hands of an overseas owner.

The same applies to power for the critical infrastructure of the region’s local authorities including water, waste water, street lights, the transport network, the port, hospitals, the telephone network and the head offices of the country’s banks and major businesses.

Only yesterday Vector chief executive Simon Mackenzie pointed to major issues relating to energy security and cyber security that need to be addressed.

Among those major issues is the ownership of Wellington’s electricity network, which, despite claiming on its website that it is a local company, is wholly owned by C&K Infrastructure Holdings, a Chinese conglomerate registered in the Cayman Islands and part of the stable of China’s richest man Li Ka-Shing.

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This is especially critical given the international issues developing between China and the United States.

Should those escalate in the future New Zealand’s decision-making heart could be disabled by a flick of the switch.

Both National and Labour governments since 1984 have made an artform out of smoothing the way for the sale of New Zealand’s land, most productive companies, and critical infrastructure to overseas owners.

That ‘smoothing of the way’ has been recognised by large donations to the political campaigns of both parties.

A compulsory re-purchase could be made without breaching the provisions of either the China Free Trade Agreement or others such as the Trans Pacific Partnership, which provide for security issues to be addressed.

 

2 COMMENTS

  1. Our family like likely to vote for ‘Social Credit’ now during the 2020 election, because Social Credit is far more ‘socially responsible’ above all others, at a glance.

    All the other parties at present appear to be leaning towards being “risk adverse” as they are all desending into the big dark hole of being risk adverse and willing to endanger our poulation and damaging the health and wellbeing of all citizens now.

    There are far better ways for political parties to meet with providing citizens with health and welbeing success while taking a bare minimum of risk.

    Risk-averse politics now seem to favour the method of playing it safe, preferring slow and steady gains to the possibility of a political failure.

    Assessment
    The first key to managing the risks involved in any project is to make an assessment.

    Developing a framework for risk assessment is worthwhile, and it doesn’t have to be a complex or high-budget endeavor.

    Risk assessment involves taking stock of any project and determining what problems could arise beyond normal expenses.

    Many outside factors must be considered, such as any adverse environmental impacts to citizens interests, while assessing the economy, citizens demand and labour relations.

    A good risk assessment takes account of anything that could go wrong with a project and firstly must have regard for the cost to provide Environmental, social, health and wellbeing responsibility then determine what it would cost would finally be.

    Risk assessment allows a political party to decide if proceeding with a project is worthwhile, ater first considering their responsibility to provide citizens with Environmental, social, healh and wellbeing.

    Labour needs to shut down half the truck freight and spend big on regional rail, as rail has a definate proven safety advantage while offering a ‘low carbon footprint’ as well.

    This simply one way to save our ‘Environmental, social, healh and wellbeing’, as there are many more that need addressing also.

    We need a bold policy of ‘action not words.’

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