Dear Pakeha, I get this feeling some of you think Treaty Settlements are the end of our debt

By   /   February 7, 2019  /   22 Comments

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The beauty of our egalitarianism and liberal progressive democracy is that it collectively enables agency of all individuals, living up to that promise demands more than a lip service white wash reparations process.  

I get this sense that many Pakeha seem to be under the impression that once all the Treaty Settlements have been settled, that’s somehow our debt paid off for all that land confiscation and racist injustice.

As if an indigenous people who lose 95% of their land and economic power with all the cultural collateral damage that intergenerational wounding causes through space and time could in some way shape or form be healed by a State reparations system that only returns 1% of the actual value and economic losses.

Cue belly laughs now, ha ha, ho ho.

“Soz for all that land confiscation and theft and all the social damage that poverty has inflicted, here’s 1% of what’s owed you, now stop blaming us”, seems to be a tad disingenuous from the white brothers and sisters in the audience.

The impact of the massive theft of land reverberates 179 years. Maori are 380% more likely to be convicted of a crime and 200% more likely to die from heart disease and suicide. Maori are paid 18% less and 34% leave school without a qualification. Maori die earlier and suffer more.

To add insult to injury, Don Brash claims any action to try and reflect that impact gets labeled ‘special privilege’.

If anyone is under the delusion that settling the last Treaty Settlement somehow means we’ve dealt with all of this past injustice and it’s time to ‘focus on the future’, can I humbly suggest that all the finalisation of the existing Treaty claims will merely be  just the first chapter in the genuine apology book.

We have an enormous amount of work to repair the Treaty injustices occurring now with inequality and poverty, and we have an obligation to extend that level of support to everyone living poor in this country.

The beauty of our egalitarianism and liberal progressive democracy is that it collectively enables agency of all individuals, living up to that promise demands more than a lip service white wash reparations process.

 

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22 Comments

  1. Sam Sam says:

    The so called settlements, for example (roughtly 2 billion 90’s). No other indigenous people got a deal like that.

    Then there’s what may happen to Auckland as a business hub (and to the whole of New Zealand as side effects ripple out) if there is no “fiscal” and “monetary” union between Māori and government.

    By the way, New Zealand as-is needs serious reforms, but I’ve had enough of National party governments and successive governments using brown people as an useful scapegoat for problems of their own making.

    • Peter Barry says:

      NZ never had any indigenous peoples, only visitors. Some of whom did decide to stay on a while.

  2. Andrew says:

    In a word: YES!

    Make the last payment and shut down the grievance industry.

    Stop giving money to treaty lawyers who are already on the rich list

    Stop giving money to tribal elders so they can swan around in black SUVs

    Stop the excuses for failure. We have recent immigrants in NZ who came here penniless who have made a success of their life here.

    There is no ‘partnership’ with the Crown. That’s invented history. Maori ceded authority to the Crown so they got the benefits of western civilization: And end to slavery, no more tribal wars and equality under the law. The benefit from this to this day (Unlike Jacinda I’ve read article 1 )

    • Trevor Sennitt says:

      Well said Andrew. I know 2 Cambodians who arrived with nothing and could not speak English in 1980. Both now own their own shop and homes. They did not get any hand out or complained about being hard done by but worked hard to make the best of their opportunities in a free land . The Maori were hard done by but there comes a point where you need to move on and reset your mind to look to the future and forget the past .
      Remember you take longer getting to the finish line if you always are looking back

      • The Maori were hard done by but there comes a point where you need to move on and reset your mind to look to the future and forget the past

        That’s really easy to say, Trevor, when you’re not the one on the receiving end of being hard done by. You can “move on” because you’re not the one who was ripped of. I bet if a group of new arrivals stole your possessions you’d not take kindly to someone else (who, by the way has indirectly benefitted from the ripping off) telling you to stop complaining; you were hard done by; now move on.

        Yours is the voice of someone who knows that our history is full of injustice (you’ve admitted as much) but isn’t willing to face up to the situation and correct it.

      • e-clectic says:

        Why did they leave Cambodia?
        Being hard done by in their native land perhaps?

      • Michelle says:

        you sound like you are jealous Trevor good on the Cambodians they were lucky they have been allowed to come to our country do they speak their language and did they bring their culture with them Trev or did they leave it in Cambodia ?

    • Jeez, Andrew, your Parallel Earth history is utterly unlike that which exists in this world. I’d hate to be a citizen living in your anglo-centric alternative reality. (In plain english: your full of bullshit.)

    • Mike the Lefty says:

      Andrew you obviously base a lot of your misinformation on “The ZB Listener’s Guide to NZ History” with a foreward by Leighton Smith and personally signed by Don Brash.
      As the Monty Python song goes: How sweet to be an idiot…..

  3. SPC says:

    Maori think they can own “our” water – na.

    The Chinese think that just because no one owns the water they can just bottle it and export it to China without restraint or even royalties – well er OK, because its legal and we cannot stop it.

    Those who take from others, can too be taken from.

    • Michelle says:

      who owns the water SPC our government said nobody but our council bylaws allow for foreigners to come and take our water for a small fee now this is not right and need to be fixed.

  4. Jody says:

    The treaty settlements have provided every Maori citizen with the financial equivalent of a brand new, budget brand colour television. You know, the kind of financial asset that Ellen gives away to audience members on every show. No thanks. I’ll take a freehold property in Auckland, an investment property in the city of my choosing, a no questions asked superannuation income, free education till death, and privileged access to employment opportunities, public services and society.

    • Jody says:

      Sorry my calculations were incorrect. Of 100 Maori citizens wanting to get into an Ellen show, only one ever does get in, to claim the television. A majority of Maori will never see any of this fabled and ample ‘treaty settlement’ being trotted out, this television. Probably just as well, the quality of programming on free-to-air tv is so dire that you’re doing Maori a favour.
      Back in 1840, a television was probably the equivalent of a broken musket, a flea-infested blanket and a couple of rusty nails, and for this those cheeky little colonials were able to purchase four square kilometres of pristine native forest (land surface area divided by number of Maori). If you think the treaty settlements have been a success then the treaty minister may have slipped you a devil’s lettuce side salad with your half cooked barbie on Waitangi day.

  5. Denny Paoa says:

    Oh dear! Looks like you’ll have to buy in some suntan lotion Bomber for some of the respondents to this piece to send them to use on their sensitive necks!
    They still don’t ‘get it’ even after you’ve explained the argument “for” as well as “why” and more importantly, how fuck’n little ‘we’ get! We even have to buy back what was our own whenua too as part of the settlement process. FFS!

  6. Jody says:

    Sorry my calculations were incorrect. Of 100 Maori citizens wanting to get into an Ellen show, only one ever does get in, to claim the television. A majority of Maori will never see any of this fabled and ample ‘treaty settlement’ being trotted out, this television. Probably just as well, the quality of programming on free-to-air tv is so dire that you’re doing Maori a favour. Back in 1840, a television was probably the equivalent of a broken musket, a flea-infested blanket and a couple of rusty nails, and for this those cheeky little colonials were able to purchase four square kilometres of pristine native forest (land surface area divided by number of Maori). If you think the treaty settlements have been a success then the treaty minister may have slipped you a devil’s lettuce side salad with your half cooked barbie on Waitangi day.

  7. Michelle says:

    One thing I get sick and tired of hearing from our pakeha whanau is ‘we all had the same chances/opportunities in our country’ now this is plain bullshit cause we didn’t it was those that governed and the agencies set up to help like state housing corporation that were bloody racist and they helped their own people not us when are our pakeha whanau going to get into their heads that the state was one of the worst for being mean, nasty and discriminative to our people. If it wasn’t for Maori Affairs our people would not have had any homes so bad and entrenched was the racism in many government departments. Housing is now a major issue in this country.

  8. Brutus Iscariot says:

    Maori today have the best of both worlds – they get to enjoy the benefits of Western civilisation, but don’t endure any material hardship or suffering in their lifetimes like past generations of Maori may have during the Musket Wars/New Zealand Wars etc.

    The tldr has to be “stop complaining about shit that happened to your ancestors.”…live in the present.

  9. Michelle says:

    I would like to see Andrew debate Margaret Mutu I think she will wipe the floor of him and those old turkey red neck racist views he holds of our people and the treaty that has never been upheld keeps upsetting him.

  10. Rickoshay says:

    A snapshot of the lefts idea of racial harmony, breakout the muskets boys, you get what you can take and hold in this world

  11. Oppressive Laughter says:

    [Laughs in colonial winning]

  12. Mike the Lefty says:

    It is amusing that those who wail about Maori getting “special privileges” are usually the ones who have:
    Got a free education, without a massive student loan.
    Got health care when they needed it, rather than waiting in line for months/years.
    Paid bugger all tax by shifting their money around in trusts or Cayman Islands bank accounts.
    Used taxpayer subsidised travel so they can jet around the world at low cost.
    Sit on multiple boards of directors, getting paid heaps, helping themselves to free lunches and dinners doing sod all workl
    And Brash moans about other people getting special privileges?
    Hah!

    • GRANT GALGEY says:

      Show me one, just one, Maori and I will listen to your crap with some sympathy. The red Indians of the USA and Canada, the Aborigines of Australia and my own ancestors, the irish, were treated in an inhumane fashion. The Maori tribes were conquered and were treated fairly and offered EQUALITY for Christ’s sake. Great Britain never offered a partnership with any of the countries they rightly or wrongly took over so why the hell would they offer a partnership in governance of a group of tribes in New Zealand who were, in view of the fact that Maori didn’t think of themselves as a ‘people’, were incapable of governing themselves?! They quite simply wouldn’t have. Face facts! With six children and twenty three grandchildren with Maori blood and several ‘Maori’ friends (all of whom happily get on with life) I am in no way racist and am an admirer of genuine Maori culture in which several of my grandchildren partake with my support. The way World politics are going we will, before too long, have good reasons to forget our petty squabbles, realize how insignificant and vulnerable we are as a nation and stand together as we did in the great wars.


 
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