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GUEST BLOG: Hadley Grace Robinson-Lewis – Social determinants of health.

By   /  December 2, 2018  /  4 Comments

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I believe it’s highly unethical for an individual’s future prospects and education level to be dictated by the amount of money their parents earn, or the level of emotional and holistic support a child receives from their parents.

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Health inequalities stem from inequities in social aspects including family abuse, family violence, poverty, poor nutrition, a lack of suitable socialisation and healthy, safe accommodation, which many individuals cannot afford. I believe it’s highly unethical for an individual’s future prospects and education level to be dictated by the amount of money their parents earn, or the level of emotional and holistic support a child receives from their parents.

 

 

I strongly feel that those in minority groups, youths and young adults who are struggling in life, must be granted an increased amount of privileges so they can reach their full potential and break the ongoing cycle of distress.

Despite the difficult or challenging environment, an individual may be born into, one should still endeavour to seek out role models, professional help and use their weaknesses as strengths. Turning weaknesses and adaptability into strengths and persistence can create a highly dedicated individual. Sometimes disadvantages can provide individuals with important future coping skills, resilience and valuable life lessons.

WE CAN DO BETTER KIWIS!

 

ABOUT HADLEY GRACE ROBINSON-LEWIS: I’m based in Ōtepoti and my iwi is Ngāi Tahu. I’m an RN, social activist and vice chair for NZNO/TR in the southern region. I’m passionate about psychotherapy, philosophy, charity, social activism and Māori health. My greatest achievement was raising $25,000 for a women’s refuge in Auckland with Habitat for Humanity.

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4 Comments

  1. Sam Sam says:

    It’s difficult placing too much faith in medical and scientific progress. We’re good and getting better, but we’re not that good.

    We will still be dying from suicide, cardiovascular disease and stroke, solid cancers, infection and dementia.

    Personally I think there’ll be minimal or only small gains across the population in terms of lifespan and small gains in quality of life but nothing substantial for Generation X and Millenials – because what gains we make are largely offset by the metabolic syndrome pandemic and social determinants of health.

    The message being don’t expect science to rescue our asses in later life – invest now.

  2. Z says:

    Did you know that for disabled people with high disability costs Temporary Additional Support (TAS) completely fucks the pyramid?

    Nobody with a soul would expect people to pay for food, rent and disability expenses when that last expense is funded at 30% of the actual cost (lower if you include the threshold before TAS kicks in).

    https://www.workandincome.govt.nz/map/income-support/extra-help/temporary-additional-support/

    • Geoff Lye says:

      Also have a good long read of this page of just how stuffed up our health system really is.

      https://m.facebook.com/groups/171564126882442?ref=bookmarks

      How many people realise our health system is ranked 41 st on the World Health Organisations rankings 4 places behind the USA and 11 places behind Australia and 21 places behind Canada.

      Our medicines funding is right at the bottom of the 20 OECD countries.

      Why do thousands of people every week, have to crowdfund or go to 365% to 624% interest charging loan companies, to pay for medicines or get a simple operation as simple as getting nerves cut in your stomach or in your legs to cure pain, that is affecting your diabetes. That public hospitals are putting people on waiting lists for, that should be operated on there and then.

      This page will give you a damn good idea of just how much of a battle one kiwi teen has had battling our privatised health system since the age of 18 to the present time at age 26 and 9 months .

    • Geoff Lye says:

      Not only that the disability allowance is a maximum of $62.00 and has been that way since it was introduced in 1996.

      Also TAS can be no more than 30% of a base Job Seekers benefit.

      The supported living allowance is a complete and utter joke.

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