CPAG’s nationwide post budget events

By   /   May 13, 2018  /   5 Comments

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Find out what the impact of Budget 2018 will be for families and children, in Child Poverty Action Group’s 2018 Post Budget presentations.

Find out what the impact of Budget 2018 will be for families and children, in Child Poverty Action Group’s 2018 Post Budget presentations.
Every year Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) hosts Post Budget events across the nation, providing a unique, low-cost opportunity for communities to come together and hear about what budgetary changes will mean for children and young people, especially those whose lives are affected by structural socio-economic disadvantage.
At each event, a child-focused analysis and commentary of the Budget 2018 (announced on May 17), will be delivered by special guest speakers, as well as spokespeople from CPAG. A light meal is provided.
We warmly invite all public and media to attend a presentation in your locality.
The events are being held on May 18 in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch and on May 23 in Whangarei and Nelson-Tasman.
May 18
Auckland Mt Eden War Memorial Hall – at the new time of 11:30am. Guest speakers include senior lecturer in economics Dr Stephen Poletti; Public Health Medicine and Māori Health expert Dr Rhys Jones; and Professor Innes Asher, Starship Children’s Hospital paediatrician and Professor of Paediatrics. The Auckland event will also be recorded live and streamed in real time at www.thedailyblog.co.nz. Visit CPAG’s Facebook page for a link on the day or make sure you’re on The Daily Blog home page.
Wellington (with the Public Health Association) The Boat Shed, Taranaki Street Wharf – breakfast served at 7:15am. Speakers include Hon. David Parker, Associate Minister of Finance; New Zealand’s Families Commissioner, Len Cook (CBE); and Honorary Associate Professor Susan St John, CPAG founding member and economics spokesperson.
Otautahi Christchurch Villa Maria Girls College, from 7:15am. Speakers include Jane Higgins, a member of the Villa Maria College Proprietor’s Board, community researcher and author; Paul Dalziel, Professor of Economics at Lincoln University; Lucy D’Aeth, a public health specialist for the Canterbury District Health Board; and Christina McKerchar, nutritionist and lecturer in Māori Health at the University of Otago.
May 23
Whangarei in collaboration with Manaia Health Public Health Organisation, 12.30pm start. Speakers include Honorary Associate Professor Susan St John, CPAG founding member and economics spokesperson as well as local Tai Tokerau speakers who will offer a focus on what the Budget impacts will be for children in the region.
In Nelson the Post Budget Breakfast will take place at Stoke Primary School Hall, from 9.30am – 11.30am. Guest speakers include Associate Professor Mike O’Brien from the University of Auckland’s faculty of social work and CPAG social security spokesperson; Lisa Lawrence, Kaiwhakahaere/Manager for Motueka Family Service Centre; Katie O’Donnell, Manager of Nelson Women’s and Children’s Refuge Services/Nga Wahine Tamariki Punanga o Whakatu. Please RSVP to cpag2016nn@gmail.com with your attendance by May 19. Download the Nelson poster here or visit the Facebook event page.
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5 Comments

  1. LOLBAGZ says:

    Child poverty is one angle, if you like discombobulating holistic pictures. It’s very in vogue. But it’s a sick society, as a whole, not just #childpoverty.

    • Strypey says:

      Child poverty is only one part of the problem, yes, but the point of holistic thinking is that you can see the whole in each of its parts, and vice-versa. If you have better ideas for how to present the poverty implications of the budget to a general audience, I’d love to read them.

      • LOLBAGZ says:

        I hope you’re right, about seeing the whole. I hope the people do. All I ask is a disclaimer, or a footnote, some acknowledgment that none of this is to marginalize, trivialize or stigmatize the families these children come from. Which is why I am a footnote

  2. Philg says:

    Poverty is the issue, which includes child poverty. Labelling it ‘child poverty’ misses the point….. But it’s better than no poverty being discussed. What about the working poor?