How do hungry kids afford education?

By   /   January 24, 2016  /   13 Comments

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According to the NZ Herald, parents are paying a record high amount for school donations, with costs for public secondary schools amounting to $3139 a year and $2047 for primary.

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According to the NZ Herald, parents are paying a record high amount for school donations, with costs for public secondary schools amounting to $3139 a year and $2047 for primary.

These costs include fees, extracurricular, clothing, necessities, travel and computers. And we all know those ‘donations’ are not at all optional.

All of those categories are necessary for a student’s learning, development and educational development.

It’s incredibly unfair for a student to miss out on a learning experience because their parents struggle to pay for it, not to mention the peer pressure that comes with that. This is how inequality perpetuates.

Of course these things cost money to acquire and someone needs to foot that bill, as unfortunate as that is. As much as education has no monetary value, we live in a system where everything is run by money, even the opportunities of innocent children in their futures.

But to put that burden on parents who are stuck between wanting the best for their children’s education and struggling to pay for the cost that comes with that.

If some families can’t even afford a decent breakfast, how can we expect all these other expenses to be easy to pay?

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13 Comments

  1. Jack Ramaka says:

    So where is all the money going that National borrows offshore $105 Billion and rising, few assets left to sell, what happens next?

    • aWanderer says:

      to fund govt. expenditure with the top three currently:-

      Social security and welfare: $28.2 billion
      Health: $14.7 billion
      Education: $13.5 billion

      What happens next?

      We are in the black so theoretically we shouldn’t have to borrow any more and we can slowly pay back our debt over the next few years.

      • Andrew says:

        Exactly right Wanderer.

        First off, all parents in NZ CAN afford to give their kids breakfast, but we have some hopeless parents in NZ who are either too stupid to budget or are spending their welfare on ciggies and pokies rather than their children. These are often the same parents who bash their kids. They don’t need more welfare, they just need neutering like stray cats.

        Secondly, most of these donations are in high decile schools where parents can more easily afford it.

        • irst off, all parents in NZ CAN afford to give their kids breakfast

          More naive garbage from you, Andrew.

          You have no inkling of personal circumstances of many low-income families – especially where rents are skyrocketing. All you’re doing is parroting cliches and victim-blaming .

          Secondly, most of these donations are in high decile schools where parents can more easily afford it.

          Again, you are spouting puerile nonsense.

          “Decile ratings” reflect neighbourhoods – not individual incomes. Whilst some might be high-income earners, others are not. You really need to stop having such a narrow view of the world. It makes you look uninformed and judgemental.

          • Andrew says:

            Frank:
            I can buy a sack of quick oats from Pak-N-Save for $3 which would provide breakfast for a large number of children for a week.

            I also know I can buy a loaf of bread for a dollar.

            Sure, I get it that money is tight in a lot of families but providing their children zilch for breakfast is simply unacceptable. This ‘pimping poverty’ gimmick the Left keeping trying simply isn’t working: New Zealanders know better and vote accordingly.

            It’s also not my problem if people on low incomes choose to produce large families. Either they’re stupid beyond belief, or they’re having the kids in the expectation of the government bailing them out. So the sooner we adjust welfare to remove the incentive for low income families to produce children they cannot afford, the better.

            See the movie: ‘Idiocracy’. It’s happening here and now!

        • Julia says:

          Andrew – right there you demonstrate what really poverty is. An inability to connect or empath. When it’s easier to maintain a lie or unexamined assumption against your neighbour than what it is to lift him up or walk beside him a little. We have misery and deprevation growing at increased rates in this land of plenty – but non are as impoverished as those that govern from a place of greed and soulessness.
          Don’t be that guy Andrew. Hatred of the oppressed has never served humanity well.

          Kia kaha.

          • Andrew says:

            Julia:

            Warm & Fuzzy is all very well, but we also need some critical thinking on this topic.

            The current welfare model is exacerbating the problem rather than solving it. National has had some success in making minor adjustments round the edges of the problem but we need to do more.

            How’s about some suggestions for discouraging DPB mums from producing more babies whilst on DPB?

            How’s about some ideas for discouraging couples from having six kids with only a minimum wage or just welfare coming into the house?

            They need a hand up not a hand out.

            • Pipi Reisch says:

              nice rhetoric Andy, you do a great line in it. My bet is you wouldn’t know how to cook a bowl of oats if it crawled out of your jacksie. By the way I bet your Scottish mother would be turning in her grave at your mean nasty rhetorical prejudice.

              Students are getting a hand-out too right? You’re towing that line too right? Education a privilege not a right… only if you’re rich that is aye?

              Your lack of empathy makes you one ugly mothafucka

            • Pipi Reisch says:

              yeah yeah yeah Andy, hand out hand out hand out…. where on earth did you lose your empathy gland…up your jacksie? you’re towing that same old hand out rhetoric to smash students that are on studylink too aren’t you? how very DARE anyone expect a hand when they’re studying… if you can’t afford an education you smelly broke person too bad you…

              ps… i’m betting you wouldn’t know how to cook a bowl of oats if it jumped in the saucepan for you… in fact i bet you don’t know how to cook anything and leave that to the wee wifie….

              you’re sitting pretty at the Capitol while the districts play out The Hunger Games and you bay for their blood you jackal

            • Pipi Reisch says:

              yeah yeah yeah Andy, hand out hand out hand out…. where on earth did you lose your empathy gland…up your jacksie? you’re towing that same old hand out rhetoric to smash students that are on studylink too aren’t you? how very DARE anyone expect a hand when they’re studying… if you can’t afford an education you smelly broke person too bad you…

              ps… i’m betting you wouldn’t know how to cook a bowl of oats if it jumped in the saucepan for you… in fact i bet you don’t know how to cook anything and leave that to the wee wifie….

              you’re sitting pretty at the Capitol while the districts play out The Hunger Games and you bay for their blood you jackal

              • Andrew says:

                PIPI: I cook and eat my oats every morning thanks. It’s a healthy and inexpensive breakfast! 😉

                You’re also wrong regarding my empathy. I come from a poor welfare situation myself so I know what it’s like. More by luck than judgement, I made a few good decisions and got out of it but most don’t: So we need a support system to drives those at risk toward better decisions rather than entrenching the problem by funding it.

  2. Neil says:

    Key, the national party & their supporters want low wages so as these people that do low paid jobs cant get a decent education

    • David See-More says:

      The ACT Party has always been about choice and the free-market. In New Zealand, ever since 1984’s Lange-ACT coalition Government, the choices for New Zealanders have been crystal clear. Vote for an ACT Party and have user-pays health, education etc. By privatising other wasteful government spending, it takes government out of the corporate sector and allows market forces to prevail.

      If you pursue higher education then I’m afraid it’s user-pays. If you don’t pursue education, that’s a choice also and Kiwis can’t expect higher wages if they choose not to invest in free-market education for their children.

      Sir Roger Douglas, Richard Prebble and all great ACT leaders since, such as Mr Banks, Mr Brash, Mr Hyde and Mr Whyte have all faithfully and unwaveringly pursued asset sales and privatisation. The market revolution will be complete when the TPPA is signed on the 4th February and we can start getting benefit for New Zealanders by offering up the last great assets such as land, foreshore and seabed.

      It’s just as well we have the charismatic and popular 4th Term shoe-in Mr Key to allow ACT to thrive and go forward into a bright new future.


 
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