Innovative publisher teams up with student media to develop Rainbow Warrior resource

By   /   May 30, 2015  /   4 Comments

TDB recommends Voyager - Unlimited internet @home as fast as you can get

An innovative community publisher has teamed up with about 40 television and journalism students and the Pacific Media Centre at AUT University to launch a dynamic microsite to honour the courage and commitment of the Rainbow Warrior nuclear-free campaigners three decades ago.

Eyes of Fire 30 Years On HiRes fbcover

Eyes of Fire microsite image of the Rainbow Warrior at Rongelap atoll in the Marshall Islands weeks before the bombing in 1985. Photo: David Robie

David Robie also blogs at Café Pacific

AN innovative community publisher has teamed up with about 40 television and journalism students and the Pacific Media Centre at AUT University to launch a dynamic microsite to honour the courage and commitment of the Rainbow Warrior nuclear-free campaigners three decades ago.

And to inspire activism for the environmental causes still to be won – like seriously addressing climate change before it’s too late.

Or continuing the struggle for the Rongelap, Tahitian and other islanders whose lives have been ravaged by the legacy of nuclear testing.

Little Island Press, which specialises in Pacific projects, has teamed up with the centre to collaborate with the journalism and television students.

The microsite also features the work of social justice photographers Gil Hanly and John Miller, whose images were published worldwide after the bombing. They also featured in the Nuclear Exodus exhibition and video.

The digital microsite – “Eyes of Fire: 30 Years On” – has already gone live. Five full studio interviews have already been uploaded and many news stories and other content will be rolled out on the website or on the PMC’s YouTube channel.

The enthusiasm and quality of work by the young students has been “awesome”, say the lecturers.

The campaign will run until the 30th anniversary of the bombing of the Rainbow Warrior on 10 July 1985 and climax with publication of a new edition – the fifth – of my 1986 book Eyes of Fire.

France stopped nuclear testing in 1996 in response to the determined and persistent campaigns by Greenpeace activists and many others.

Eventually, the Rainbow Warrior microsite is expected to become a resource for education.


AUT television and screen production major student Hayley Becht talks to David Robie as part of the Rainbow Warrior: 30 Years On project.

***
Want to support this work? Donate today
***
Follow us on Twitter & Facebook
***

About the author

Dr David Robie

Professor at AUT University

Dr David Robie is professor of journalism and director of AUT University’s Pacific Media Centre. He is a strong advocate of independent media at the country’s journalism schools. David has published the media transparency blog Café Pacific since 2006. - See More

4 Comments

  1. R Atack says:

    like seriously addressing climate change before it’s too late.

    Get over it people IT IS !

    http://www.22after.com

    Again I will point out – ‘we’ have gone from 280 ppm CO2 to 400 ppm in about 20 CH4 life times eg less than 240 years.
    The last time the environment went from 280 to 400 it took something like 800 CH4 lifetimes or 10,000 years. We are now facing 800 or so lifetimes worth of CH4 within the next TEN YEARS … do the math.
    Picture this – we have a Jeanne the size of Gerry Brownly and a bottle the size of an eye dropper.
    Admittedly Gerry might not be the best example, because if we gave him an enema he would fit into an eyedropper, but in reality we can’t remove that much shit from the environment.

  2. elle says:

    Are you aware that you capcha test cant add up? I believe that’s why there are less comments .Often if I forget it reminds me, but when I go back more often than not the comment is deleted. Capcha insists that 2+2 dosnt =4and deletes again
    Maybe this is why you are getting less comments,this just happened to my first comment on capcha, I persevered maybe others wont.

    • Blake says:

      The same thing happened to me twice and I just let my comment go and did not submit it. It seems as though you may have fixed this recently.


 
Authorised by Martyn Bradbury, The Editor, TheDailyBlog,